Khadija

Division of film storylines shows Hollywood’s greed

Apr 2 • Khadija Djellouli, Opinion • 1455

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The movie industry is slowly sinking to a new low, and with that so are moviegoers’ wallets.

It was recently announced that the new movie installment in the Harry Potter series, “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them,” will be released as a three-part movie.

It’s not exactly unusual nowadays for film companies to release movies in multiple parts, but it’s been getting out of hand for a while now.

When it was announced that “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows” would be released as a two-part movie, I really didn’t think much of it, nor did I think too much of it when that happened with “Breaking Dawn.” But that was mostly because I don’t care too much about “The Twilight Saga.”

Then a couple of years ago, we found out that “The Hobbit” was going to be released in three parts. I thought that was justifiable because the book is so large.

But when I found out that “Mockingjay,” the third installment in “The Hunger Games” series, was going to be made into two parts, I got a little upset.

In the case of a book having a sizable length to it, I don’t mind if movie producers want to split it up into three different movies, but “Mockingjay” is nowhere near as long as “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows” or “The Hobbit.”

It would have been perfectly feasible for “Mockingjay” to be made into one movie.

Aside from the frivolousness of making two movies out of one story, now anyone who wants to see the movie will have to buy two tickets if they want to see it in full. On top of that, if anyone wants to own the movie, they have to buy both parts.

Like I said it’s understandable in some cases to make two movies. But in this case, it’s obvious that the movie studios are just trying to make more money.

Now, the same thing is happening with “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them.” Unlike the previously mentioned books, this book is like a reference book that was adapted into a screenplay with a storyline.

However, I can’t imagine how there could be so much information for a screenplay derived from a book with less than 50 pages that it needs to be split into three parts.

To be fair, I have not read the screenplay, so it’s entirely possible that it could be fairly long, but if this kind of trend continues, I along with many other avid movie goers are not going to be happy.

I’m all for spreading a movie into three parts in the name of getting every detail from the books into the movies, but I’m against the idea when a studio just wants to see how much money it can get from a franchise.

I certainly hope this trend doesn’t continue, because my desire to go watch movies and my pocketbook will not be able to handle it.

 

Khadija Djellouli

djelloul001@knights.gannon.edu

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