Connor

Connor’s Corner

Mar 26 • Connor's Corner, Opinion • 404

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College is a time for individuals to hone in on their ability to manage time effectively, but some Gannon University students prefer to complete assignments later than others.

The tranquility of the night offers some a distraction-free studying experience, and also allows them the ability to catch up on important projects.

There seems to be a recent rise in variations of attention deficit hyperactivity disorders among students, and this alternate time to work would offer members of the Gannon community who suffer from the aliment a conducive learning environment.

In addition to students with learning disabilities, many Gannon student athletes have hectic practice and game schedules, which hinder their ability to make it to the library during designated hours.

Ken Brundage, the director of Nash Library, said transforming the library into a 24-hour working facility is on Gannon’s radar.

A year or two ago when the university did the feasibility study about doing a renovation of the library, Brundage said the subject came up.

“And it is the hope that if we do get a chance to renovate the library in the next few years that this is something that will be considered,” he said.

It is great that Gannon is working toward possibly making these changes in future, but students desire change now. Being kicked out of the Power Room – which is the late-night open destination for students – on a Friday night before you can finish your paper is unacceptable.

Gannon’s library has taken some steps in responding to students’ wants. Brundage said the library is open until 3 a.m. during finals week, and added that a member of Police and Safety is on duty in the building after midnight.

He said there would be some problems that come along with changing the library into a 24-hour facility. Sectioning off the library, security and staffing would all be problem areas for the upgrade.

The security issue could mostly be resolved with adoption of an identity-card system, much like the entry system found on Gannon housing facilities. An extra security guard designated to the library would also be necessary – but doesn’t seem farfetched – given their duties on finals week.

Adding employees to look after the building would also be necessary.  The new staff members’ salaries could prove to be costly, but that would have to be weighed against the desires of the students.

Brundage said he was aware of Gannon opening some areas of the library for unlimited access in the past before his time starting in 2007.

“I do know that in the ‘90s, they did have the classrooms downstairs on the ground flood open 24 hours,” he said. “They had a gate that they pulled across the one hallway and they opened up this creepy stairwell.”

He said he wasn’t entirely sure why the access was stopped before his time, but added the attempt proved how difficult it is to section off different parts of Nash.

Brundage said the most logical option would be to open all 82,000 square feet of the building for students, which would offer all the different learning environments the library has available. He added that he didn’t have this problem when he was in college.

“I never pulled an all-nighter in my life, but I know students do,” Brundage said.

I have pulled my fair share of all-nighters, and I would have much rather been in the library than been stuck behind a cramped desk in my room.

Brundage said that if this was something that the students would actually use then it would be worth the investment. It would be worth it because students today are doing more outside of the classroom than ever before.

The stress of college life can be difficult to handle at times, and having a dependable work space whenever it is neccessay can be extremely helpful.

 

 

CONNOR SONDEL

sondel001@knights.gannon.edu

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