Colleen

Notable events in February remain unnoticed

Feb 19 • Colleen Langham, Opinion • 370

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So it’s February and sometimes I think people forget that it’s Black History Month.

It’s already Feb. 19, and I haven’t heard of any events planned for Black History Month on campus. Being the news editor, I generally hear of almost every event or at least see it on the event calendar on Gannon’s portal. It doesn’t seem like I missed the memo though because there were never any events.

Now I know there was Unity Week, but I think that is about embracing all groups, people and organizations on campus.

I recently thought about this issue when I was watching “The Butler” for the first time. “The Butler” is a movie based on real events of an African-American man who witnesses notable events, such as the civil rights movement of the 20th century, and several presidencies while he serves as a butler in the White House.

I went through several emotions throughout the film – depression, nausea and exhaustion – from the emotional roller coaster.

The civil rights movement seems like something everyone has learned about since they were in second grade. But for some reason, every year, it stills has a strong effect on me. That’s probably why I’m upset about this situation.

We – students – get so excited when we don’t have class on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, but do we really consider why we get that day off or why Dr. King is so important to us? What he did and sacrificed just to receive human rights that all Americans are given today?

It’s hard to not get wrapped up in having a day off from class – we all need that day off. But each year, I notice a little less passion in people during February as we celebrate equal rights.

I love embracing other races, especially during Black History Month. Dr. King is an iconic leader who deserves more than the whole month of February.

Hearing about all of the struggles and horrific stories about racism and yet the peaceful approaches that many African-Americans took is so inspiring and life changing.

I come from a suburb that is very diverse – much like Erie – and I think that’s what made me who I am today. I enjoy taking in other cultures and being around people from numerous races and cultures.

It’s upsetting when people can’t see eye-to-eye with other races or cultures. You can easily embrace other races as well as maintain your own. It’s just hard for me to understand why people are unaccepting and ignorant because I’ve never been that way.

You can leave a conversation with a person of a different race or culture and have gained an inimitable understanding of a race that you once thought you knew.

It’s difficult for one to accept more than one perspective because we’re so used to our own, but you are merely broadening your own.

Gannon does a good job at embracing other races and cultures, but this year for Black History Month, the university fell short.

 

COLLEEN LANGHAM

langham001@knights.gannon.edu

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